OJ 210 Seg 3

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
210
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Rocket Sleds
Body: 

Twenty years ago Dave Sellers was looking for a way to enjoy a downhill experience without waiting on lift lines or sticking to groomed trails. He came up with the rocket sled — six pounds of plastic and foam rubber that a rider kneels in and floats down the powder on. A rocket sled is light enough to carry easily as you hike up a mountain. And because your legs are strapped into it, when you shift your weight the sled will turn quickly. Its design leaves a thick "monorail" of snow underneath that helps hold an edge, but will collapse when you want to make a turn. The sled is designed for powder and its maneuverability lets the rider tackle trees as well as moves such as Eskimo rolls and helicopters. Host Marianne Eaton joins members of the Mad River Rocket Company for a hike up Granville Gulf and a run on the powder.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1399337845?starttime=1093&end=1585
Image: 
Order: 
3
Extra Info: 

OJ 210 Seg 2

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
210
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Boone & Crockett
Body: 

There's an exciting story behind every set of antlers that is brought home by a hunter. In most cases, the bigger the rack, the larger the animal. Keeping a record of the measurements pays tribute to the hunter, the animal and the managed habitat they come from. The Boone & Crockett Club is the oldest conservation club in the United States. Started by Teddy Roosevelt in 1887, it promotes conservation and outdoor ethics, and supports wildlife research and management. The club maintains records for North America's big game animals. A Boone & Crockett measurer uses special guidelines to measure both antlers and skulls to determine an animal's size. The club maintains statistics for Canada, Mexico and the United States. At the Sportsmen's and Women's Appreciation Banquet organized by the Vermont Department of Fish & Wildlife every two years, hunters are encouraged to bring in their racks for measurement by the state's only Boone & Crockett certified measurer. We visit this year's banquet at the Montpelier Elk's Club, where certified measurer Ron Boucher shows us how it's done.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1399337845?starttime=593&end=1088
Image: 
Order: 
2
Extra Info: 
  • Ron Boucher
    P.O. Box 373
    Wallingford, VT 05773

OJ 210 Seg 1

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
210
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Lake Trout Ice Fishing
Body: 

When many people think of ice fishing they think perch, crappie and other panfish that are popular with winter anglers. But from the third Saturday in January to the second Saturday in March on Lake Whiloughby in the Northeast Kingdom, fishermen turn their attention to bigger game under the ice. That's when lake trout season has anglers dreaming of twenty-pound-plus lunkers being pulled through the ice. The lake is famous for producing some of the largest trout in New England. A good-size laker trout in Whiloughby is between eight and ten pounds. But in 1986, Barry Cahoon of Danville went into the record books by pulling a twenty-six pounder out of the lake. Going after trout in January isn't for everyone. You have to be willing to dig through two feet of ice and put in some long hours watching your tip-ups in cold conditions. But for many New Englanders a day on the lake is more than just fishing. It's a chance to catch up with old friends, experience nature in the winter and, for a moment, dream a little of a big one on the end of your line. Host Lawrence Pyne joins Barry on a brisk February morning of fishing for big lake trout on Lake Whiloughby.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1399337845?starttime=73000&end=588
Image: 
Order: 
1

OJ 902 Seg 3

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
902
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Dead Creek Wetlands Management
Body: 

Vermont has more than 80 state wildlife management areas covering well over 100,000 acres. Management activities on these areas vary by habitat type, but perhaps none are more intensively managed than wetland wildlife management ares. Although wetland areas like the Dead Creek WMA in Addison look often like they do not need any improving, behind the scenes state biologists and volunteers work year-round to make them as attractive and beneficial to wildlife as possible.

YouTube ID: 
BDRpH8dRyMU
Start Time: 
886
Image: 
Order: 
3

OJ 902 Seg 2

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
902
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Victory Basin Wildlife Management Area
Body: 

The centerpiece of the nearly 5,000-acre Victory Basin Wildlife Management Area is Victory Bog. This shrubby, peat-moss wetland is fed by small streams that drain the mountains that ring the basin, which eventually flow into the Moose River. Victory Bog is home to several unusual plants, including the insect-eating pitcher plant. With its diversity of rare bird species and network of maintained trails, Victory Basin attracts bird watchers from across the region. But it also hosts a variety of other outdoor activities.

YouTube ID: 
BDRpH8dRyMU
Start Time: 
573
Image: 
Order: 
2
Extra Info: 

OJ 902 Seg 1

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
902
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Crappie Fishing on Lake Champlain
Body: 

The Lake Champlain Basin is home to more than 70 species of fish, including the greatest assemblage of panfish in New England. Yellow perch, pumpkinseed, bluegill, smelt, bullhead and other panfish have long been popular targets for anglers both young and old, and in recent years crappie have been growing in popularity. Lake Champlain is home to two species of crappie, the common black crappie, or calico bass, and the white crappie, or silver bass. Black or white, crappies are fast becoming a lake favorite.

YouTube ID: 
BDRpH8dRyMU
Start Time: 
86
Image: 
Order: 
1

Profile - Jean Charest - Extra

Series: 
Profile
Episode #: 
1027
Zone: 
Web Extra Video
Header: 
Web Extra
Body: 
Extra Info: 

Vermont This Week - May 6, 2011 Extras

Series: 
Vermont This Week
Episode #: 
2931
Zone: 
Open Area
Header: 
Governor Shumlin Press Conference
Body: 
Order: 
1

OJ 301 Seg 3

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
301
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Fishing for Walleye
Body: 

At one point walleye were the most popular game fish for recreational anglers in Vermont. A thriving commercial fish market existed for these toothy members of the perch family into the early 1960s, with as many as 65,000 harvested annually. During the late '70s and early '80s the population dwindled and concerns grew that overharvesting or environmental issues were responsible for the decline. In 1984, the Lake Champlain Walleye Association was formed with the goal of restoring, preserving and protecting the walleye fishery in the Lake Champlain Basin. The Association has worked closely with the Vermont Department of Fish & Wildlife to monitor walleye populations. In the tributaries of Lake Champlain, fish are caught, measured, sexed and some tagged for research purposes. The Department also collects eggs for fertilization. Over the last six years they have collected 64 million walleye eggs, which has resulted in over 40 million fry being stocked in Lake Champlain. The first Saturday in May marks the opening day of walleye season on tributaries flowing into Lake Champlain. Host Lawrence Pyne heads out with walleye enthusiast Cubby Smith on the Lamoille in search of "Old Marble Eyes."

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1908985796?starttime=1001000&end=1579
Image: 
Order: 
3

OJ 301 Seg 2

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
301
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Bat Research
Body: 

Vermont is home to 9 species of bats. Biologists recently discovered that large numbers of Indiana bats spend the summer in the Champlain Valley.

Download the teaching materials created by Mary Anne Deer (and students), Putney Central School, Putney, VT.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1908985796?starttime=590000&end=997
Image: 
Order: 
1

CEO Holly Groschner is "Talkin' Vermont"

Holly is on a mission to get to know more Vermonters, what inspires them, what makes them tick, and to learn how Vermont PBS can better serve. Watch the video...

Our Productions

Original series, specials, documentaries and web shows produced by Vermont PBS

Lifelong Learning

Learn about our new PLUS channel


A second HD broadcast service offering alternative programming and more content from local and regional producers.

 

Vermont PBS Weekly

Our weekly email newsletter highlighting upcoming shows and important station news. Sign Up Today!

Vermont PBS

204 Ethan Allen Avenue
Colchester, VT 05446
(802) 655-4800
© 2015 Vermont PBS
All Rights Reserved

Facebook Twitter YouTube LinkedIn Pinterest